Review: The Gatekeeper’s Daughter by Eva Pohler

July 30, 2013 Book 1

Title: The Gatekeeper’s Daughter

Author: Eva Pohler

Genre: Young Adult, Paranormal Fantasy, Romance

Series: Gatekeeper’s Trilogy #3

Publisher: Green Press/ Eva Pohler

Publication Date:  May 1st 2013 

Source: Ebook copy provided by author in exchange of honest review

The Gatekeeper's Daughter (Gatekeeper's Trilogy, #3)

Goodreads Summary:

In The Gatekeeper’s Sons, Therese and Thanatos, the god of death, met and fell in love. In The Gatekeeper’s Challenge, they did everything they could to be together, even break an oath on the River Styx. But the Olympians don’t tolerate oath-breakers.

In this final book in the trilogy, The Gatekeeper’s Daughter, Therese may have finally succeeded in becoming a goddess, but if she wants to remain one, she’ll not only have to discover her unique purpose, but also make some allies among the gods. Artemis sends her on a seemingly impossible quest across the world, while Than searches for a way to appease Ares. To make matters worse, her baby sister’s life depends on the outcome of her quest.

My Thoughts:

For being the last book in the Trilogy, I was amazed at how it all developed in the end. After being a little disappointed with the outcome of the second book, The Gatekeeper’s Challenge, I didn’t know what to expect with this one.  It was worth the read.

The story takes off when Therese wakes up after being burned to become a goddess. All this against an Oath made by Than and all the Gods, except Dionysus.  The life of a goddess isn’t an easy task for Therese as she has to finish High School, the welcoming of a new cousin/sibling, her relationship with Than, friends, and finding her one purpose. And the danger of being kidnapped by Ares because she and her future offsprings’ with Than can be a danger to the god of war.

I really liked how in this book Eva has you guessing what is going to happen next. And its also a surprise for me when Therese chooses to resume being a normal teenager as much as she cans, even when she’s a goddess. Her character stays true to its original self I first knew of in The Gatekeeper’s Sons. What I liked the most of her was the fact that she didn’t have that bitching aspect she had in a lot of parts in the previous book. She looked more understanding and patient in the situations handed to her in this book. Plus, she was gentle, nice, caring, smart, and a fighting character as always. I like it when characters stay true to themselves and in their own shell they also get to evolve into better people.

Awesome!

While I loved most of the characters, specially Than, I didn’t like the gods. Their personalities felt stiff and forced, too formal. When I make a comparison with how Rick Riordan writes of each of the gods, they don’t feel that way. Each one of them has their own personality. One’s easy-going, one is always moody, funny, serious, wise, crazy, and so on. In The Gatekeeper’s Daughter it wasn’t so bad, but I feel like it can be improved. With that, they’d be more than amazing 🙂

oh no yes

The writing style in general was easy to read. Sometimes I struggle with third-person point of view because it feels too formal when reading Young Adult, but here Eva Pohler delivers it so great it often feels like its on first point of view instead. She knows how to play with words to keep you hooked in the story. I can see here how her writing style kept improving from when I read the first book in the series, The Gatekeeper’s Sons. And the pacing was amazing! This novel took it to a whole new level the previous two didn’t reach. There were times where I felt breathless in action or fighting scenes. I was completely hooked to the story, flying the (electronic) pages away to know what was going to happen next.

Now the only other thing that made me give this book 4 stars instead of 5 was this. I didn’t like how some conflicts got solved.

Tyra No No

I’ll give a brief example to try and not spoil much. There’s a scene where Therese is stuck holding the sky. And she thinks to build some columns (or something like that) to keep the sky high and in its hold. I think “This isn’t going to work because if that was the case, someone would have thought of a way to keep the sky from the earth and free Atlas. Or even Atlas himself would have done something like that”. But things get resolved and Therese is away from the sky and all that sudden life-changing problem. Boom, its no problem now and it was solved in five pages. Some problems got solved right away and way too easy. And some of these problems were very important in the story. While some took a lot of pounding and thinking to solve, others were instant. It didn’t convince me enough. And this specially happened int he last few chapters of the book. it was going so good when this started to happen. It all ended (kind of) happily ever after. There wasn’t the kind of struggle I expected given the things Therese and Than went through because of Ares and the other gods.

All in all, it was a good ending to the Trilogy. And because of this book, I’ll be keeping a watchful eye because Eva Pohler plans on publishing more books with Therese and Than in them, plus Jen and Hipnos too 😉 The Gatekeeper’s House comes out November 1st. The Gatekeeper’s Secret will be released April first of next year, and the final book, The Gatekeeper’s Promise in November of next year, too.

If you like Greek mythology, I’m sure you’ll enjoy these books. A must read for all lovers of the Greeks.

Fangirl

Rating: 4 stars

really liked it J signature

Find the book: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Goodreads

Author: Website

The Gatekeeper’s Sons Review on Goodreads

The Gatekeeper’s Challenge Review 

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I'm Jennifer. Addicted reader, and lover of books. I'm a full-time college student majoring in English Liturature and Linguistics & Communication, with aspirations of being a professional editor. Among other things. In the meantime, I obsess over books, history, art, and politics. I believe in freedom of speech and reading whatever you want. Open to discussions about anything and everything 🙂